Archive | March, 2013

Our “China Syndrome” isn’t What It Seems

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Our "China Syndrome" isn't What It Seems
Here’s what the typical non-Asian American “knows” about China, whether or not it’s actually true: 1. We owe them a boatload of money. If China ever demands payment or decides to stop lending us more, our economy will hurl over the cliff even faster than our “sequester” Congress is capable of sending it. 2. Factory…
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The coverage in the media and the tech component of the case brought out an eclectic group of protesters in Steubenville

Steubenville & Social Media: How Twitter Brought Two Rapists To Justice

On Monday, March 17, two high school football stars accused of raping a 16-year-old girl, in one of the most publicized rape cases in recent history, were found guilty. The story, sadly, was not such an uncommon one: male teen athletes taking advantage of a young girl is a storyline that has played on television…
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FYIs: World Water Day, DOMA, and Leaning In

FYIs: World Water Day, DOMA and ‘Leaning In’

For this week’s FYI list we bring you some shocking statistics on the global water crisis, real-world arguments on DOMA, some tidbits from around the web on Sheryl Sandberg’s new book “Lean In”, and more. World Water Day Friday marked the 20th “World Water Day”, and as the New York Times reported “since the first…
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New stats show some people enjoy looking like weirdos at sporting events

Peanuts, Cracker Jacks, and Big Brother

Time magazine just published its annual “10 Big Ideas” issue, although the “ideas” were shoved off the cover by the newly -anointed Pope Francis, a tacit admission, perhaps, that “the old ideas are the best (selling).” But one of the “big ideas” on Time’s list is “Spying on sports fans,” which sounds like it belongs…
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Clarence Earl Gideon, the unlikely man who helped guarantee our right to a public defender

Gideon v. Wainwright Turns 50: A History of Your Right to Counsel

A public defender at a criminal arraignment spends, on average, six minutes per case. Imagine that the remainder of your life as a free citizen were hanging in the balance.  Would six minutes be adequate time for your attorney to hear your side of the argument and enter an appropriate plea? As troublesome as that…
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